Breiğafjörğur Bay (What To See - West)

Breiğafjörğur Bay (What To See - West)
Breiğafjörğur Bay in West of Iceland is famous for it´s many islands and very rich bird life. Breiğafjörğur Bay is about 130 kilometers long and 50 kilometres wide. There are around 3000 larger and smaller islands in the bay, many of them are only inhabited by countless bird species like Puffins, Black Guillemots and Common Eider as well as White Tailed Eagles. The bay area is very popular for whale and birdlife watching boat tours. Various boat trips are available from Stykkishólmur and Grundarfjörğur towns, both located on the northern coast of the Snæfellnes peninsula. The Snæfellsnes Peninsula is a large penisula that divides the west coas of Iceland tnto two large bays, Faxaflói Bay to the south of the peninsula and Breiğafjörğur Bay to the north. At the tip of the mountainous peninsula is the magnificent Snæfellsjökull Glacier. A ferry port is located at Stykkisholmur Town, making daily trips accross the bay between Stykkishólmur and Brjánlækur, a ferry port on the south coast of the Westfjords. Along the way, the ferry makes a short stop at Flatey Island, the only island on the bay that is inhabited all year round. Flatey Island (Flat island) used to be one of Icelands cultural centers and trading posts where in the year 1172 a monastery was founded but later moved to the mainland. One of Icelands largest medieval manuscript Flateyjarbok was preserved in Flatey for many years and named after the Island. Writing a manuscript of this size took a fortune as they were written on calve skin and required skins from about 113 calves. Today most houses in Flatey are only occupied during summer with just a handful of people living there all year round. The well kept and colorful old houses and the fact that there are no cars allowed on the island, makes you feel like traveling back in time when you get there.

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